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Christians for Biblical Equality

Here is an article recently published in Christianity Today

Popular Christian psychologist Larry Crabb has a new book out, Fully Alive, with the subtitle "A Biblical Vision of Gender That Frees Men and Women to Live Beyond Stereotypes." Though I haven't read the book, I did read his recent Christianity Today interview about it, and I can tell that this new book (his 41st) contains more of what has earned Crabb the respect and popularity of a large audience.

The orthodox doctrine of the Trinity and the argument that the eternal subordination in authority of the Son is the ground for the permanent subordination of women in authority. Giles
See Kevin Giles, The Trinity and Subordinationism: the Doctrine of God and the Contemporary Gender Debate, InterVarsity, 2002; Jesus and the Father: Modern Evangelicals Reinvent the Trinity, Zondervan, 2006.
The debate
I am sure that most of you are aware that today one of the most commonly heard arguments in evangelical and charismatic circles for the permanent subordination of women is the Trinity argument. It goes like this: In the Trinity the Father has authority over the Son and this is a model for the man-woman relationship. Divine life in heaven prescribes how men and women should be ordered on earth. It is often put this way: in heaven the Father is head over the Son and on earth men are head over women, at least in the home and the church.

An outsider's response to an insider's defence of the Anglican Diocese of Sydney given by  Michael P. Jensen in his book, ' Sydney Anglicanism: An Apology', (Eugene, Or.:  Wipf and Stock, 2012).
Kevin Giles

(I encourage those who get this paper to buy Michaels' book and read it carefully before reading my response and when they read my work that they check carefully my quotes of what Michael says.)
A book defending the Anglican Diocese of Sydney, written by a true blue Sydney evangelical Anglican, is well overdue after a number of books written by critics who have majored on what they think are the more negative aspects of the diocese. Few could be better placed to do this than Michael Jensen. He has lived most of his life in the diocese; he is the son of the Archbishop of Sydney, and therefore free to say things no one else could say without crippling censure or marginalisation; he is a lecturer at Moore Theological College, the flag ship of the diocese, and he is a scholar, holding a doctorate from Oxford University.

Before turning to what Michael says,[i] I need to make it clear that when I speak of “Sydney Anglicans” or “Sydney”, like him, I am speaking collectively of those who endorse the prevailing doctrines and practices of the Anglican Diocese of Sydney, and in particular of those who hold power in the diocese. I am well aware that there are many dissenting voices, and on some matters, Michael Jensen is one of these.

I’m trying to get my head around what Complementarians believe, and I think it goes something like this:

Complementarians think there is a “headship” hierarchy in the universe. God the Father has always been “head” of the God the Son. When Paul wrote about Jesus being by very nature God, and having this stripped from Him in the incarnation, that was a bit sus… not Paul’s finest hour. The Trinity is a chain of command, not some quaint idea of perichoresis of three Persons equally God.

Read the rest at http://secret-womens-space.blogspot.com.au/2013/02/im-trying-to-get-my-head-around-what.html

An address by Bishop John Harrower, Hobart, 29 April 2004 - originally on the Anglican Diocese of Tasmania website,  republished by permission.

Bishop John Harrower

I am more often in the media because of the issue of sexual abuse by clergy, than I am for domestic violence. There are, however, some parallels between the two issues. I believe we can learn from some of the mistakes the church worldwide has made in responding to these issues in the past. Mistakes that led to more children being sexually abused - or in the case of domestic violence, more women and children suffering deep and long lasting damage. (Domestic violence includes physical abuse, psychological and emotional abuse, sexual manipulation and abuse, isolation, economical deprivation and stalking.)

The first response of the church world wide to allegations of sexual abuse by clergy, was 'not to hear', because the belief was 'that good Christian men, who we knew, could not behave like that.' So the church's first response was 'not to hear' and its consequence, 'not to believe.' We face the same tendency when told of domestic violence.

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